Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders

Original Research Article

From Smart Homes to Smart-Ready Homes and Communities

Helal S.a,b · Bull C.N.a

Author affiliations

aSchool of Computing and Communications, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK
bFaculty of Health and Medicine, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK

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Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord 2019;47:157–163

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Research Article

Published online: June 27, 2019
Issue release date: July 2019

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1420-8008 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9824 (Online)

For additional information: https://beta.karger.com/DEM

Abstract

Background: People have various and changing needs as they age, and the number of people living with some form of dementia is steadily increasing. Smart homes have a unique potential to provide assisted living but are often designed rigidly with a specific and fixed problem in mind. Objectives: To make smart-ready homes and communities that can be adaptively and easily updated over time to support varying user needs and to deliver the needed assistance, empowerment, and living independence. Method: The design and deployment of programmable assistive environment for older adults. Results: The use of platform technology (a special form of what is known today as the Internet of Things or IoT) has enabled the decoupling of goal setting and application development from sensing and assistive technology deployment and insertion in the assistive environment. Personalising a smart home or changing its applications and its interfaces dynamically as the user needs change was possible and has been demonstrated successfully in one house – the Gator Tech Smart House. Scaling up the platform technology approach to a planned living community is underway at one of UK’s National Health Services (NHS) Healthy New Town projects. Conclusions: There is a great need to integrate technology with living spaces to provide assistance and independent living, but to smarten these spaces for lifelong living, the technology and the smart home applications must be flexible, adaptive, and changeable over time. However, people do not just live at home, they live in communities. Looking at the big picture (communities), as well as the small (homes), we consider how to progress beyond smart-ready homes towards smart-ready communities.

© 2019 S. Karger AG, Basel




References

  1. Office for National Statistics [Internet]. Deaths registered in England and Wales (series DR): 2016 [cited 2018 Sep 18]. Available from: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsregisteredinenglandandwalesseriesdr/2016
  2. United Nations. [Internet]. World Population Ageing [cited 2018 Sep 18]. Available from: http://www.un.org/en/development/desa/population/publications/pdf/ageing/WPA2015_Report.pdf
  3. Raei P, Bouchachia A. A Literature Review on the Design of Smart Homes for People with Dementia Using a User-centred Design Approach. Proceedings of the 30th International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference: Fusion! 2016 Jul 11-15; Poole, UK. Swindon, UK: BCS Learning & Development Ltd; 2016. 51:1–51:8 p.
    External Resources
  4. Helal A, Mann W, Elzabadani H, King J, Kaddourah Y, Jansen E. Gator Tech Smart House: A Programmable Pervasive Space. Computer. 2005 Mar;38(3):64–74.
    External Resources
  5. Helal S. Programming Pervasive Spaces. IEEE Pervasive Comput. 2005 Mar;4(1):84–7.
    External Resources
  6. Russo J, Sukojo A, Helal A, Davenport R, Mann W. SmartWave Intelligent Meal Preparation System to Help Older People Live Independently. Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Smart Homes and Health Telematic (ICOST). 2004 Sept 15-17; Singapore. Vol 14. 122-135 p.
  7. Giraldo C, Helal A, Mann W. mPCA – A Mobile Patient Care-Giving Assistant for Alzheimer Patients. 1st International Workshop on Ubiquitous Computing for Cognitive Aids (UbiCog’02); 2002 Oct; Gothenburg, Sweden.
  8. Davenport R, Elzabadani H, Johnson J, Helal A, Mann W. Pilot Live-in Trial at the GatorTech Smart House. Top Geriatr Rehabil. 2007 Mar;23(1):73–84.
    External Resources
  9. Helal A, Chen C, Bose R, Kim E, Lee C. Towards an Ecosystem for Developing and Programming Assistive Environments. Proc IEEE. 2012 Aug;100(8):2489–504.
    External Resources
  10. Chen C, Helal A. Device integration in SODA using the device description language. Proc. IEEE/IPSJ Symp. Appl. Internet. 2009 Jul;100–106. https://doi.org/10.1109/SAINT.2009.24.
    External Resources
  11. Khaled AE, Helal A, Lindquist W, Lee C. IoT-DDL—Device Description Language for the “T” in IoT. IEEE Access. 2018 Apr;6:24048–63.
    External Resources
  12. Gallery of photos of the Gator Tech Smart House. https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1ES3j5KJtUZf7cO168LMC610wW_j6D_GM?usp=sharing.
  13. Whyndyke Farm, Fylde. https://www.england.nhs.uk/ourwork/innovation/healthy-new-towns/whyndyke/.

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Research Article

Published online: June 27, 2019
Issue release date: July 2019

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1420-8008 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9824 (Online)

For additional information: https://beta.karger.com/DEM


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